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Monday, August 29, 2016

Generic Price Gouging

Even “low price” substitutes cause sticker shock
By Phil Mattera in the Dirt Diggers Digest

Mike Luckovich
For more cartoons by Mike Luckovich, CLICK HERE
Price gouging by the producer of EpiPens has been creating a hardship for those suffering from severe allergies, but it is also revealing the truth about the one segment of the drug industry that was thought to have some decency.

Mylan, the corporation behind the EpiPen scandal, is best known as a leader in the production of generic drugs, which were supposed to weaken the stranglehold of the pharma giants. 

Building on the 1984 Hatch-Waxman Act, Mylan and the other generic firms began to have an impact. Mylan introduced cheaper versions of brand-name medications for Parkinson’s disease, depression, arthritis and other ailments.

In the past decade or so, however, Mylan began to stray from its mission. The company became preoccupied with growth and was soon appearing in the business news more in connection with mergers than with product announcements. 


In the early 2000s it got entangled in a drawn-out dispute with investor Carl Icahn over the attempted purchase of King Pharmaceuticals.

While that deal did not go through, Mylan made a string of other deals, including the 2007 purchase of the generics businesses of Germany’s Merck KGaA, among which was EpiPen producer Dey L.P.. 

Mylan was also acquiring legal problems. In 2010 the Justice Department announced (in a press release that did not mention Mylan) that Dey would pay $280 million to settle False Claims Act allegations. 

DOJ said the case resolved claims that Dey “engaged in a scheme to report false and inflated prices for numerous pharmaceutical products, knowing that federal health care programs relied on those reported prices to set payment rates. The actual sales prices for the Dey products were far less than what Dey reported.”

Mylan went on with its dealmaking, even to the point of giving up its identity as a U.S. company. In 2014 Mylan — led by CEO Heather Bresch, daughter of West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin — arranged to merge with a foreign subsidiary of Abbott Laboratories and used the deal to reincorporate itself in the Netherlands to lower its tax liabilities.

Last year, the new Mylan launched a takeover bid for its rival Perrigo and then found itself targeted by yet another generic producer, Teva Pharmaceuticals, which had its own legal problems

Neither of these deals panned out, but this year Mylan acquired the Swedish company Meda for some $10 billion.

Among its other businesses, Meda is the European distributor of EpiPens. It is unclear to what extent Mylan’s recent EpiPen price hikes are meant to pay for the Media acquisition. 

They may also be designed to cover the steep increases in executive compensation at the company. 

In 2012, when Bresch became CEO, she was paid annual compensation of just under $10 million and realized more than $6 million in paper profits from the exercise of stock awards and options.

In 2015 Bresch’s annual compensation jumped to nearly $19 million and her profits from the exercise of stock awards and options soared to nearly $32 million, putting her total compensation for the year at more than $50 million.

Perhaps Mylan and the other generic drug companies never were real crusaders, but now it is difficult to distinguish them from the worst rogues of Big Pharma.