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Sunday, May 26, 2019

Who decides?

Progressive comic about abortion and impeachment.

How to prevent thousands of deaths: Don't report them

Pic of the Moment

Here are some new ways to lose all your money

How cryptocurrency scams workNir Kshetri, University of North Carolina – Greensboro


Image result for cryptocurrency scamsMillions of cryptocurrency investors have been scammed out of massive sums of real money. In 2018, losses from cryptocurrency-related crimes amounted to US$1.7 billion.

The criminals use both old-fashioned and new-technology tactics to swindle their marks in schemes based on digital currencies exchanged through online databases called blockchains.

From researching blockchain, cryptocurrency and cybercrime, I can see that some cryptocurrency fraudsters rely on tried-and-true Ponzi schemes that use income from new participants to pay out returns to earlier investors.

Others use highly automatized and sophisticated processes, including automated software that interacts with Telegram, an internet-based instant-messaging system popular among people interested in cryptocurrencies. Even when a cryptocurrency plan is legitimate, fraudsters can still manipulate its price in the marketplace.

An even more basic question arises, though: How are unsuspecting investors attracted to cryptocurrency frauds in the first place?

Generic drug makers sued for price-fixing

The Other Collusion
By Phil Mattera for the Dirt Diggers Digest

Image result for generic drug price fixingThe Trump crowd may have escaped prosecution on charges of colluding with the Russians, but another case involving collusion is moving full steam ahead. 

Attorneys general from 43 states and Puerto Rico are pursuing a blockbuster lawsuit against the generic drug industry on charges of conspiring to artificially inflate and manipulate prices, reduce competition and unreasonably restrain trade for more than 100 different products.

Led by Connecticut Attorney General William Tong, the coalition claims to have extensive evidence in the form of emails, text messages, telephone records, and statements from former company insiders documenting that 20 companies such as Teva, Sandoz and Mylan engaged in a “broad, coordinated and systematic campaign” to conspire with each other to generate prices increases that in some instances exceeded 1,000 percent.

The case, which could result in a multi-billion-dollar settlement, is a reminder that price-fixing, one of the oldest forms of corporate crime, remains a live issue. 


Department Of Education Agenda: Make room for the Holy Ghost

Amid Budget Cuts, DeVos Supports Christian Bible Classes in Public Schools
By Terry H. Schwadron, DCReport Opinion Editor

Image result for nun teaching classThe Trump administration has proposed a 12% cut in Department of Education spending under its yearly budget. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos is busily eliminating programs to help public schools and promoting private education efforts under the motto of choice. 

Yet somehow, magically, there is support for the growth of teaching Christian Bible classes in public schools.

Once again, we have an out-and-out statement about what is important in this administration—not school shootings, not affirmative efforts to improve public education, not help with student debt or even the pursuit of growing sexual assault on school campuses.

Counseling Today magazine argues, for example, that it has become necessary to lobby seriously to keep federal money for school mental health.

The Trump administration’s federal budget proposal cut $8.5 billion from the Department of Education, including the Student Support and Academic Enrichment program. That program supported, among other things, mental health, school security and safety, community engagement—the kind of programs that would address the issues we hear after every school shooting.


Saturday, May 25, 2019

America needs a long term care program for seniors

A state model worth examining

Related imageBy 2035, seniors are projected to outnumber children in the U.S. population.

Maybe then we’ll look back and credit Washington state activists for being on the forefront of tackling America’s elder care crisis. 

On May 13, the state became the first in the nation to adopt a social insurance program for long-term care benefits.

“This is a huge victory for organizing and people power, for care and caregiving, and for older adults and people with disabilities,” said Josephine Kalipeni of Caring Across Generations, one of more than 20 groups that formed Washingtonians for a Responsible Future to push the path-breaking legislation.

Nationally, our long-term care financing system is broken. Medicare doesn’t currently cover home care or nursing facility care, while Medicaid coverage varies widely by state. To qualify, you have to meet poverty criteria, which requires people to spend down nearly all of their savings before getting coverage.

So what do people do?


Sensible solution

CRU hosts a conversation on Thursday



Dear Friend,

Charlestown Residents United (CRU) cordially invites you to an
"Evening of Conversation"

WHERE: Charlestown Police Station Community Room
WHEN: Thursday, May 30, 2019
TIME: 7 PM - 9 PM

Guest speakers will include:
TOWN MODERATOR: Charlie Beck
TOWN COUNCIL VICE PRESIDENT: Deb Carney
CRU CHAIR: Jodi Frank

Topics of Conversation:
·     Upcoming Budget Vote
·     $ 3,095,000 Of Your Money....How Would You Like It Spent?
·     Open Conversation About Other Town Issues

Light refreshments will be served.
Please R.S.V.P. to crunited1@gmail.com and include your name and email address.

Thank you, Charlestown Residents United
Jodi Frank, Chair





Charlestown Residents United (CRU) is a Political Action Committee dedicated to providing a voice to all Charlestown residents.






Paid for by
Charlestown Residents United
P.O. Box 412
Charlestown, RI 02813




The past is prologue

Your internet data is rotting
Paul Royster, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
File 20190508 183083 co1y4v.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1Many MySpace users were dismayed to discover earlier this year that the social media platform lost 50 million files uploaded between 2003 and 2015.

The failure of MySpace to care for and preserve its users’ content should serve as a reminder that relying on free third-party services can be risky.

MySpace has probably preserved the users’ data; it just lost their content. The data was valuable to MySpace; the users’ content less so.

One shot for life

New approach by Stanford researchers could lead to a lifetime flu vaccine
BY AMY ADAMS

Image result for lifetime flu vaccineIf the virus that causes flu were an ice cream cone, then the yearly vaccine teaches the immune system to recognize just the scoop – chocolate one year, strawberry the next. As the virus changes each year, so too must the vaccine.

A new approach that teaches the body to recognize the cone portion of the virus – which stays the same year-to-year – could shake up that yearly vaccination ritual and protect people against pandemic flu like the one that killed 40 to 50 million people in 1918. 

The team working on this new approach, led by Stanford biochemist Peter Kim, has shown early signs that their technique works in lab animals. They warn that they still need to make their vaccine more specific and show it works in much larger studies before testing it in people.


Up next – Trial in Monsanto’s hometown set for August after $2 billion Roundup cancer verdict

"The things that have gone on here, I want St. Louis juries to hear thisstuff."

Image result for roundup cancer verdictsAfter three stunning courtroom losses in California, the legal battle over the safety of Monsanto's top-selling Roundup herbicide is headed for the company's hometown, where corporate officials can be forced to appear on the witness stand, and legal precedence shows a history of anti-corporate judgments.

Sharlean Gordon, a cancer-stricken woman in her 50s, is the next plaintiff currently set for trial. Gordon v. Monsanto starts Aug. 19 in St. Louis County Circuit Court, located just a few miles from the St. Louis, Missouri-area campus that was the company's longtime world headquarters until Bayer bought Monsanto last June. 

The case was filed in July 2017 on behalf of more than 75 plaintiffs and Gordon is the first of that group to go to trial.

According to the complaint, Gordon purchased and used Roundup for at least 15 continuous years through approximately 2017 and was diagnosed with a form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 2006. Gordon has gone through two stem cell transplants and spent a year in a nursing home at one point in her treatment.


Friday, May 24, 2019

Not the way to mark Memorial Day

Pardoning war criminals is a bad way to honor Memorial Day
Image result for pardoning war criminalsHow are you spending Memorial Day? Ordinary people may attend parades, host cookouts, or take the long weekend to visit loved ones.

Donald Trump, on the other hand, may pardon a few war criminals.

The president recently requested the files of several accused and convicted U.S. war criminals, a possible step toward expedited pardons for individuals who’ve done unspeakable things.

There’s SEAL chief Edward Gallagher, who senselessly shot to death a teenage girl and an elderly man in Iraq. Gallagher also brutally stabbed a wounded 15-year-old to death — and then posed for photos with the body, which he texted to friends.

Trump also requested the files of Nicholas Slatten, a Blackwater contractor convicted of shooting dozens of Iraqi civilians in the notorious 2007 Nisour Square massacre, and of Mathew Golsteyn, who confessed to murdering an unarmed Afghan captive U.S. soldiers had released.


Later

For more cartoons by Ted Rall, CLICK HERE.

Another moment of clarity

Image may contain: 1 person, text that says 'IF THIS LIFE MATTERS BUT NOT THIS ONE YOU'LL HAVE TO STOP PRETENDING YOUR CONCERNS ARE RELIGIOUS'

Myths about gossip busted

Study explores nuances of who gossips, and what they gossip about
University of California - Riverside

chris knierim wow GIF by Team USAA new UC Riverside study asserts that women don't engage in "tear-down" gossip any more than men, and lower income people don't gossip more than their more well-to-do counterparts. 

It also holds younger people are more likely to gossip negatively than their older counterparts.

It's the first-ever study to dig deep into who gossips the most, what topics they gossip about, and how often people gossip -- 52 minutes a day on average.